Blog Awards Ireland 2017

Hi all,
Hope you are all as well as can be, sorry about the little hiatus, I was in hospital and im only just out but more on that in another post, right now I am back for a bit of begging!!

It’s that time of year again where nominations for the best blogs in Ireland go forward for the Blog Awards Ireland and I have just entered this humble little bloggie in for the running.

If you have just a moment to nominate, and thats all it will take, please nominate the blog by scrolling down and popping in the blogs url at the following link

If the blog makes it to the Long List I will be back looking for further support from you so I just want to say a massive thank you to all who take the time to support this blog, THANK YOU!

Will be back soon with another medical update from while I was in hospital and more on my current new diet 🙂 Thanks all 🙂

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Saturday Submissions – With Dr. Liam Farrell

It’s a day late, I know, I know, I’m sorry – (It will be worth it, promise!) I haven’t been well in the last few weeks, I completely forgot all about Saturday Submissions last week and then I do it a day late this week, oh dear! I can do better than this, surely!!

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This week I speak to Dr. Liam Farrell, yes, a real doctor, or at least used to be a family GP, now better known as an award winning columnist and broadcaster. You can find Liam over on Twitter as @drlfarrell.

 

Why presentations are best served rare

We are doctors; we do terrible things to people. They come into the surgery like healthy folk and go out as patients. If they’re really unlucky we confine them to an institution where the occupants are routinely left immobile, deprived of sleep, fed a diet that is tasteless and nutritionally marginal, and experience the de-humanizing indignity of being half-naked all the time.

‏The average age of a patient in general practice is 75 years old.. Many have multiple diagnoses, and their care is incredibly complex, and above all requires more of our time. But our time is in increasingly short supply, so much of it wasted on the worried well and on health promotion. If we reckon on 15 mins per consultation, a family doctor with 2500 patients would spend 7.4 hours per day to deliver all recommended preventive care and 10.6 hrs per day to deliver all recommended chronic care.

‏This leaves a generous 6 hours every day for those pesky acutely ill patients, sick certs, insurance and passport and DLA forms, paperwork, eating, sleeping, banging our heads against the wall in sheer frustration, toileting and reproducing. But what is never understood, by patients, the general public, the media, bureaucrats, managers or politicians, is the huge numbers of people family doctors see who aren’t sick, and who have nothing wrong with them; this really can’t be comprehended unless you sit in with a family doctor for a whole surgery. A huge part of our job is telling people what they don’t have. Unfortunately, ‘nothing wrong with you’ is a retrospective diagnosis and can only be made after the consultation.

As the threshold for attending healthcare services grows ever lower, there are more and more worried well, too much screening and over-treatment. It becomes harder and harder to pick out the really sick person from amongst the ranks of the worried well; when you are looking for a needle in a haystack, the last thing you need is more hay. There is consequently not enough time and resources to the really sick; so everyone loses, especially those with hard to recognise rare diseases.

As The Fat Man said in The House of God, when a medical student hears hoof-beats outside a window, he thinks it’s a zebra.

Which might be true, of course, in certain circumstances – if you were in practice in the Serengeti, for example (curiously, I was once in the Serengeti, heard hoof-beats outside my window, peered through the early morning mist and saw only an old cow).
A medical axiom used to be that common things are common and uncommon presentations of common diseases are more common than common presentations of uncommon diseases. But this is now known to be misleading. Taken all together, rare diseases, and rare variants of common diseases, are not uncommon. And diagnosing rare diseases is very difficult; it’s not as if there is a are disease specialist we can refer patients to.

I do have some hard-earned experience. As an intern, I saw a young lad in casualty. He had fainted at a disco (yes, it was that long ago, Saturday Night Fever was quite fashionable. Old age is creeping up on me, not sure why but fairly sure it’s up to no good) and he had a few unusual skin lesions and a labile BP.

These days, I doubt if I would be able to recognise a phaeochromocytoma ( a rare tumour of the adrenal glands) if one walked up and assaulted me with a blunt speculum (I’ve been flogged into apathy by too many URTIs and sick certs, rare and interesting diseases only present to other doctors), but I was young then, fresh and sharp and so hip, I could hardly see over my pelvis.

I wrote ‘possible neurofibromatosis?’, ‘possible phaeo?’ on the chart and admitted the young man to the ward. I was too green to realise the importance of hoarding unusual cases to myself, for my own advancement, and sure enough, the rumour spread around the hospital as fast as an epidemic of flaming gonorrhoea.

Later, when I went to check up on my patient, I found him buried under a tide of medical students, SHOs and research registrars, all keen for a piece of the glory, all ordering 24-hour urines, all dreaming of a case report for the peer-reviewed journals and another notch on their CVs.

‘Help me, doc,’ he said, desperately, ‘they’re suffocating me.’ I whipped away the students, but the others were far above me in the hierarchy and I could offer little succour.

‘Sorry, pal,’ I said. ‘It’s a common complication of uncommon diseases.’

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Thank you so very much to Liam for providing todays Saturday Submissions!
What did you think of his post?
Do you relate as a medical Zebra?

Please leave a comment and let Liam know what you think, be sure to check out his Twitter Link and make a new connection! 🙂

——— Wanna Be Part of Saturday Submissions?———-

All you have to do is tell us a little about yourself and write a blog post (Any Wordcount) in relation to your chronic illness, or how a relation/friend/patient with an illness affects or interacts with you, etc. all welcome!

You can include photos (preferably your own, if found online be sure to add links to where you found them)

Be sure to add links to your social media accounts so people can link back to you OR You can write it anonymously if you like just be sure to put your details in the email so I can respond to you personally 🙂

You can send your submissions to: irishpotsies@gmail.com

Saturday Submissions – Switching Up My Life: How Gaming Helps Me Cope With Disability

Today’s ‘Saturday Submissions‘ guest post comes from the lovely Melissa over on the blog ‘AutisticZebra

You can also find her over on Twitter by the handle @TheAutisticZebra

Here, in the very first of our ‘Saturday Submissions‘, Melissa speaks about how Gaming has helped her to cope with her Chronic illness. If anyone knows me, they’ll know how much I love gaming, especially Nintendo, so I am quite jealous as well as being delighted for her with what she just picked up for herself and this post seems very appropriate to be the first of the Saturday Submissions!

Please enjoy and if you would like to take part in Saturday Submissions, please see below the post for further info.

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Switching Up My Life: How Gaming Helps Me Cope With Disability

“I turn forty next week. And as an early birthday present, I have just bought myself a Nintendo Switch. I will, of course, share it with the kids, but even if I didn’t have any kids, I’d have bought it. I never thought I’d get into gaming in my thirties, but here I am.

The Nintendo Switch box, plus The Legend of Zelda Breath of the Wild game.

I was never that into gaming as a child. We didn’t have a console and had limited access to games. The only game my dad ever bought us was a PC chess game. Somehow we ended up with two other games, Prince of Persia and one I think was called Leisuresuit Larry in the Land of The Lounge Lizards! Oh, and Tetris. And Solitare. So, a deprived childhood.

Original Donkey Kong Game

Original Donkey Kong Game

On the odd occasion that I’d be visiting a house where video games were played, I’d do my best to join in. This was how I got to experience Donkey Kong and a few racing games. And I did terribly. I could not understand the rules or controls or stand not doing that well. And being teased about it. And yet, I loved watching the others play. I admired the graphics and everything else that went into the games. I just thought they weren’t for me.

Nintendo Wii

Nintendo Wii

And then, in 2011, when I was the grand old age of 34, my son won a Nintendo Wii in the school Christmas raffle. He was four, and as he has since proclaimed: “that day changed my life forever”. He’s not the only one. We have since moved on to the Wii U, as well as two 3DS handheld consoles, and a laptop bought just for gaming.

Playing Life in Hard Mode!

Playing Life in Hard Mode!

The arrival of video games into my life happened to coincide with when my health started to go seriously downhill. And I discovered that video games are the perfect accompaniment to days spent unable to get off the sofa. They provide the ultimate distraction. On days that I can’t physically play them, I watch the kids play them and that helps with the pain as well.  They help keep my brain sharp. They are a fantastic way to bond with the kids, to enter their world. Especially as both my kids are completely obsessed about video games and hardly talk about anything else. It’s a real advantage to know what they are talking about.

Original Nintendo Consoles With Games

Original Nintendo Consoles With Games

And so, to put it mildly, I am hooked. I told my kids that my ultimate life goal is to play every game that Nintendo has ever released. They laughed and said it’s an impossible goal. I say nothing is impossible, and at least it gives me something to aim for!

Nintendo Switch Logo

Nintendo Switch Logo

And so, this morning, I picked up the just-released Nintendo Switch. To say I’m excited would be an understatement. I actually feel happy, rejuvenated, really alive. My pain has melted into the background as the excitement and adrenaline is kicking in. And as I wait here for the kids to get home from school so we can have a great Unboxing Ceremony, I can’t help reflecting on how gaming has allowed me to cope so much better with being disabled. And I’m sure I’m not the only one!”

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Thanks so very much to Melissa from The Autistic Zebra for giving us our first post for our Saturday Submissions guest blog post.

How do you distract yourself from your chronic illness? What hobbies and pass-times do you enjoy? Are you a gamer too?
Please leave a comment of advice or help for Melissa and others in your situation. Share your thoughts on how to take your mind off your illness.

Be sure to check out Melissa’s links above and show her some support 🙂

————- Wanna Be Part of Saturday Submissions? ————-

All you have to do is tell us a little about yourself and write a blog post in relation to your chronic illness, all welcome!

You can include photos (preferably your own, if found online be sure to add links to where you found them)

Be sure to add links to your social media accounts so people can link back to you OR You can write it anonymously if you like
🙂

You can send your submissions to: irishpotsies@gmail.com

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Please Add Your Blog To Our Blogroll!

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Are you a blogger?
Is your blog relating to chronic illness or health & lifestyle? Would you like to have your blog added to our blog roll on the right of this page?

YEAH?!!

Then leave a brief description and a link to your bloggy in the comments below and ill get adding 🙂

Hope you are all well? 🙂

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