Saturday Submissions – With Denis Murphy – Parkinson’s Disease and Self Expression

Parkinson’s Disease and Self Expression.

Hi, my name is Denis Murphy and I’m from Cork city. I am currently living in a little village in county Sligo.
A major turning point in my life came in 2007 when, at the age of 48,
I was diagnosed with early stages of Parkinson’s Disease.

I would like to share some of my thoughts, feelings and emotions with you as I believe by sharing, we can better understand what we are going through,
which often seems like a lonely struggle.
It can also bring a better understanding to our family, friends and loved ones.

We can get caught up in our own worries and forget that our disease or condition not
only affects our own lives but those around us and they often feel as frustrated and
confused as we do.
I am very lucky to have such an understanding wife.
She has had M.S for over thirty years so she has great patience,
empathy and understanding through her own experiences.

As anyone who suffers from Parkinson’s Disease,or has a family member who does,
will know and understand that it brings about drastic changes, both physically and mentally.
It can be very difficult for people with Parkinson’s to
express their emotions, feelings and
to cope with their loss of power and independence.

One of the many physical conditions is called “The MASK “.
This is when the face muscles become stiff and rigid and expressionless.
The eyes appear to lose their sparkle and the mouth seems to be
permanently in a “sad” position. To the outside world this appears as if the person with Parkinson’s Disease
( or PWPD for short) is uninterested, bored and
apathetic. But behind this stern facade lies a sea of feelings and emotions.

Another symptom of Parkinson’s is a problem with vocal expression.
The voice becomes weak and we lose our strength and with
this we begin to lose confidence in ourselves.
We find it more difficult to express our opinions
and ideas in public as we struggle to be heard.
So between difficulties with facial and vocal expression
we can withdraw into ourselves and stifle our emotions.
All the more need for an outlet to express these
emotions, feelings and fears.

So many PWPD find this through art, be it painting or crafts or writing.
While Parkinson’s Disease severely restricts our physical and mental activities,
there is one advantage.
Whether it is the disease itself or the side effects of the medication
but it seems to stimulate the creative areas of the mind.
So it is only in the last two years I have begun
to compose and express my feelings through my poetry.

The main themes of my poems are about coping with Parkinson’s Disease
or any disability and the fears and hopes and also about our
relationship with Nature and with ourselves.

So enough about me, I hope that you will enjoy the
rantings and ravings of a mad Corkman and that my words may
stimulate your mind and make you think about life,
changes, and above all, appreciate this wonderful
gift we have been given.

–  c/ Denis Murphy 23 April 2017. 

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 Background information on the poem – A Parky in the Pub

This is the first poem I ever wrote about Parkinson’s. So it was an important step for me
in revealing my personal feelings and exposing my emotions publicly.
I used humour to write about a serious subject.
I do not like the term “Parky” but in this case it’s just a play on the word party.

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A Parky in the Pub

I’ll head down to the pub for a drink and the craíc
Sure I’ll be dead long enough on the flat of my back
So I make my way down to my local bar
On the other side of town for a chat and a jar
Some sit alone, some sit together
Talk of the match or of the weather
And after a pint or two
I need to visit the loo
So I shuffle and stagger around tables and chairs
Aware of the glances, the pity and stares
Through the noise and the clatter
The gossip and the chatter
I make my way back to my friends and my table
Slow progress but thank God I’m still able
The lads at the bar exchange advice and opinions
To the world’s problems and all their solutions
While the girls at the table share secrets and giggle
And walk pass the lads with a sway and a wiggle
The winking and nudging, the secret half glances
Some of the lads even fancy their chances
The smutty jokes and clinking glasses
The lad’s loud laughter like braying asses
As they drown out the music like crows in the nest
It’s time to go home for some peace and some rest
So I say my goodbyes in words and mumbles
And make my way home in staggers and stumbles.
The journey home seems twice as long
But I’m on the right road not gone wrong
Two steps forward one step to the side
Steady as she goes watch that stride
Left foot right foot no downward glance
Sure I might yet get to star in River Dance
– c Denis Murphy Aug 2015

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Thanks so much to Denis for todays Saturday Submissions post. Be sure to check out Denis’ own blog and make a connection. I love the poem and the play on words here to show the symptoms of Parkinson’s akin to those of being drunk. How do you feel about his poetry, does it resonate with you? Be sure to leave some feedback for Denis and share the love! 🙂

——— Wanna Be Part of Saturday Submissions?———-

All you have to do is tell us a little about yourself and write a blog post (Any word count) in relation to your chronic illness, or how a relation/friend/patient with an illness affects or interacts with you, etc. all welcome!

You can include photos (preferably your own, if found online be sure to add links to where you found them)

Be sure to add links to your social media accounts so people can link back to you OR You can write it anonymously if you like just be sure to put your details in the email so I can respond to you personally 🙂

You can send your submissions to: irishpotsies@gmail.com

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Doing a dry run test for London!

So yesterday and today I have been doing a dry run for London, meaning I have to try and stay up for at least 11 hours straight, without bad symptoms kicking in, to be able for my flights and trip to London on May 13th. Sounds easy right?… yeah! I am having trouble and I still have 3 hours to go today!! I usually last about 4 to 5 hours up before bad symptoms and desperate fatigue get in the way and I need to rest in bed again so I need to be able to do this to go on the trip.

The itinerary starts for the trip on May the 13th at getting up at 5am to check in on time and fly out for the 7:30am flight to London, then I have to make it to London and to the specialists appointment at 12:30pm and wont be at the hotel until at least 4pm, so that is 11 hours from getting up at 5am! Then and only then will I be able to rest for the first time on the trip. To anybody else this would be simple but not for me.

I got up at 9 yesterday and made it to 8pm last night, then watched The Expanse and then passed out cold in bed for a couple of hours, I really needed the sleep and symptoms had kicked in pretty bad throughout the day. I simply do not have the stamina and health like I did the first time I went to London so I decided to do another dry run of it today. I got out of bed at 10am this morning and I have to make it to 9pm tonight and I have to say I am finding it tough!

I have the tickets bought for the trip and I really don’t want to have to change or cancel them so I have to be safely able to do this without bad sickness and symptoms getting in the way.

If I do this successfully, Ill let you know, but, I am finding it hard and may have to change the itinerary around a little to be better able to compensate my physical needs, but hopefully that wont need to happen.

Here’s to the next 3 hours, let’s do this!!! (I hope!!)

Lette xxx – (Fainting Goat!)

Saturday Submissions – With Ciara Chapman

In Today’s Saturday Submissions, I speak to the lovely Ciara Chapman from ‘My Chronic Pain Diary’,

Ciara is from Cork here in Ireland and is 34 years old.  As yet she is undiagnosed but has been experiencing chronic pain as a result of a nerve problem for 2 years now and she’s been getting through the experience by creating a beautiful illustrated diary.

Taken from the ‘About’ page on her site:

“I started ‘My Chronic Pain Diary’ in January 2016 as a form of Art Therapy to help me cope with the mental and physical toll Chronic Pain has taken on me. It’s a very lonely and isolating experience, even if – like me – you are fortunate enough to be surrounded by and supported by the people you love. I found the medication I was prescribed made it difficult for me to read, the words were fuzzy and I had my fill of television so I turned to my love of drawing. I hope by sharing this diary it will reach people in similar situations, whether you are experiencing physical, mental or emotional pain it is so important to remember we are not alone.” – Ciara Chapman – http://www.mychronicpaindiary.com

Please take a look at these images, I think they are so full of meaning, fun and life, very beautiful and excellently executed. I love them! Enjoy!

 

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One step forward, two steps back.

3_Physio

Physiotherapy

5_OpinionAfterOpinion

Opinion after opinion after opinion…

7_Endless nights

Endless nights with little sleep

9_V2OutToSea

Out to sea

51_HelpWanted

Help Wanted.

52_RainRainGoAway

Rain, rain go away

53_Knowingyourlimits

Knowing your limitations

56_IveStartedMeditation

Meditation

14_Ifeelguiltysometimes

I feel guilty sometimes

36_TimeFreeze

Time Freeze

 

Thanks so much to Ciara for sharing her wonderful illustrations with us, they really are stunning, please be sure to check out her link above and make a connection and please leave a comment or feedback if you relate to any of these images.

——— Wanna Be Part of Saturday Submissions?———-

All you have to do is tell us a little about yourself and write a blog post (Any word count) in relation to your chronic illness, or how a relation/friend/patient with an illness affects or interacts with you, etc. all welcome!

You can include photos (preferably your own, if found online be sure to add links to where you found them)

Be sure to add links to your social media accounts so people can link back to you OR You can write it anonymously if you like just be sure to put your details in the email so I can respond to you personally 🙂

You can send your submissions to: irishpotsies@gmail.com

Saturday Submissions – With Stephanie Baxter

I know, I know! I am late with this again, I am so sorry, I just couldn’t get to the computer the last few days because of the health once again. I will have to do them during the week and have them publish automatically on the Saturday morning. I will do better, I promise!

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In this weeks Saturday Submissions, we speak to a good friend of mine that I know through Facebook as ‘Tuffy’, She has a host of chronic illnesses and this is the first ever telling of her own story. So lets hear it for Tuffy and give her a warm welcome to the world of Blogging! 🙂

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Saturday Submissions With Stephanie Baxter

I’ve never told my story before because it’s weird and I’ve ended up with a bunch of rare things. People tend to get either bored or uncomfortable with the full version. I’m having to come up with some creative reasons why I’m in my wheelchair.
I’ve summed up with a Sword fight. I don’t get such a fun reaction. I’m thinking of changing it!

Anyway, I’m an old lady (48) But I’ve had issues with my heart palpation since I was 17 or so. When I was 20 I was pregnant with my first kid. The doctors wouldn’t listen to me. The palpations were so bad anywhere I would go I would have to stop everything for about a minute. Only because my heart was beating so fast and hard. Talk about a massive head rush! But I was also told they were side effects of pregnancy.

So, after a few years and another kid (I really was terrified of dying during birth) everyone around me told me I was fine & if the doctor wasn’t worried, why should I be? Ok First Lesson people!! If it’s your body and Your scared, Start Screaming for Anyone to listen!!

I put up with this for 10 Years before I Finally was diagnosed. I had to get a blood clot first, But hey, your body has to do what it Needs to do. So, I’m 27 years old and finally I’m seeing a Cardiologist. I told him that my heart goes super fast. He asked me if he could check it out. I thought, heck why not. It’s probably nothing.. Wrong Answer!! I’ve got stickers all over my chest and this readout starts printing and the Doctor gets All excited!!!

OK, Lesson number 2, When a Doctor gets Excited, be Scared.. it’s Not good News! I have an inherited disease called (WPW ) Wolff Parkinson White. My electrical pathways were kinda not working right. So it was (is) making my heart palpate.

The doctor told me I was in the 10% of the population, oh and I needed an ablation right away or I can go into a heart attack and die. Yeah, my inner voice yelled at me for listening to all those Stupid people!! Who in the end, didn’t really give a crap.

As I said, listen to yourself… so, I went in for my first ablation. Well, it ended up 2 of them because the first one didn’t quite take. After about 2 or 3 years I started taking Hawthorne supplement. Because my palpations started to come back.

Then after a few more years and a Great deal of stress I was Finally diagnosed with Pots and the WPW came Roaring back.

Now just so we all know, my paternal grandfather had wpw, they didn’t have a name for it in the 2nd war, he would be driving his supply truck in Germany and a bomb went off, he just ended up in the ditch with “heart attacks”. Which is what they were. But there was nothing they could do for him.

Personally it really sucks! Plus the pain is right Nasty. Chest pain and all. Back to me, I got to play with beta blockers & calcium Channel blockers to keep my heart under control, it just ended up confusing my heart, it was up to 300 then it would drop to 30 in just a few seconds. Thus me checking on the floor making sure it wasn’t lonely. I Never did get to pass out, but ya know.. I’m a blonde asthmatic dyslexic.. why add on to that??

The doctors got mightily concerned and decided I needed a pacemaker. My first. Wow, I got to name him. Something fancy, so I came up with Engleburt Humperdink! (You young ones look him up) it fit great!! I went in & as the doctors who have been putting in pacemakers for Decades, they put in the first lead.. that went smoothly it was the upper lead they had major issues, my heart took off and I’ve Never seen 2 Cardiologist freak out before. They couldn’t slow down my heart for anything. They never had this happen before. I suppose they finally found the relaxant. Yeah, it’s a fun story. They stapled me together and within 6 months I had to go in for another ablation.

They made me stay awake. All together in 10 years I’ve had 9 ablations. Yes, they made me stay awake during all of them (the first 2 were exception) as I’ve said I’m Really rare and different. I felt every ablation, just as I can feel my heart go into tachycardia. The last ablation they tried to make me completely dependent on my pacemaker. They were only 95% my heart still goes off but now only for a limited time. Few seconds here and there. Nothing like it did. Now I’m dealing with the pots.

But I found out more family info. My mother had the same thing, so does my niece’s (2) so now I’m finding out its genetic. When it’s genetic the symptoms are severe. Where I Live, I was told that all they can do is just treat the symptoms. I’m getting new symptoms and they are not pretty. So, we moved to a new state for better medical care. My timing couldn’t be worse, Spring is kicking me around like I’m it’s new punching bag. Being bed bound is hard enough, but now we’ve got to find another place to live and paperwork to do plus finding doctors that might just care.

If your wondering, I found Irish Dysautonomia back when I was around 30ish. A Long Time ago!! I found you guys on YouTube. It was the first time I was introduced to what the Crap I really do have. I’m thankful for the support and information that I’ve found. It’s very personal and individual in its attacks.

I’m also bipolar 2. So I’m on a few meds right now. Fludicourt for my blood pressure is the main thing, but then I’m finding out that anxiety is a symptom as well. Which having bi-polar 2 & ptsd Really makes me realize how severe this crap is. I’m very open about my mental health as well as my physical health. I’m one person, why separate? If my stress (anxiety) is affecting my heart why treat my mind and my heart seperate?

So, I’m really big on coping strategies. They Really do help. Anyway, I’m around sometimes on Facebook my name is Tuffy Baxter, I would like to be on Facebook a lot more, but it’s difficult.

Thank you for reading this blog. It is my first at telling this story. I hope if anything helped give a smile or 2. I suppose I shall see you all soon in the funnys!! 😍😍😍

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Thanks hugely to Tuffy for that Blog post, please be sure to check her out on Facebook and make a link and please leave a comment below if you relate to Tuffy’s post 🙂

——— Wanna Be Part of Saturday Submissions?———-

All you have to do is tell us a little about yourself and write a blog post (Any Wordcount) in relation to your chronic illness, or how a relation/friend/patient with an illness affects or interacts with you, etc. all welcome!

You can include photos (preferably your own, if found online be sure to add links to where you found them)

Be sure to add links to your social media accounts so people can link back to you OR You can write it anonymously if you like just be sure to put your details in the email so I can respond to you personally 🙂

You can send your submissions to: irishpotsies@gmail.com

 

Rescheduling Life! – I don’t want to, I have to!

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*Sigh…

Lots going on as usual but the past couple of weeks, health wise, have been terrible. I have had to reschedule so much and it’s a constant thing now. I try (more like hope) to plan for something, get excited the couple of days before if I am at a base level of sick that I can live with but then at the 11th hour I have to cancel because my health has decided to go batpoop out of the blue!

Just this morning I had to let someone down having agreed to take part in something (voluntarily, social network wise) that would have given me, and you as the readers that interact, an incredible opportunity to raise awareness of Dysautonomia, EDS, all the related conditions and rare diseases in general. It was supposed to start Monday, However, given the closeness of nearly calling an ambulance on and off over the past couple of days, it would have been really crappy of me to take something on that I may not be able to fulfill so I had to step down for now. It broke my heart to do it too, but hopefully I may get another chance.

This past week, last Sunday, I had decided to go and support a couple of friends at ‘The People’s Park’ where they had a wonderful Art Performance called ‘Nice Screams‘ as part of EVA International Biennale of Contemporary Art in Limerick in Ireland. They are called ‘Softday‘ and they are mega, be sure to check them out.

But yeah, had to let them down the last minute also because I was so ill that every time I attempted to move in the bed I vomited and this with the savage nausea ended up making me very tachycardic. The 2 days before this I had been ok, sick but manageable, had even been speaking to one of my friends in the wee hours of the morning saying that I had been good and was looking forward to going to see their piece. A few hours after going to bed though, that all changed. I held on hoping something would change but I couldn’t realistically go anywhere the state I was in, then Keith couldn’t go either because he can’t leave me alone incase I syncope or seize without breathing.

It’s a shyte state of affairs to be honest, but I also know I am not the worst case either. There are far worse than me out there. At the same time though, it’s still not easy having to be constantly supervised and those doing the supervising cant move an inch either. I think that is very unfair especially on my Husband as it is fulltime for him.

Tuesday the 26th I had an important consultation with Dr. Akbar in Cork University Hospital. He is a Gastroenterologist and from what I hear, he is very good and very well up on EDS. He is also well acquainted with Prof. Aziz in London.

When I was over in London meeting Prof. Grahame who diagnosed my EDS Hypermobility type, with possible overlaps of other EDS types, he heard about my stomach and gut issues and strongly urged I go and see their Neurogastroenterologist called, Prof Aziz. I haven’t been able to get over since (Tried a number of times to get over and had to cancel because of mostly hospital admissions and their recovery) and now, I currently have been told not to travel for health reasons and as such until I can go see Prof. Aziz in London, for now at least, Cork is closer to get to. Except on Tuesday, we again were in the territory of calling an ambulance. I had to reschedule and thankfully I got another appointment for the 17th of May. Hopefully I can make that one. I am so pissed I had to miss it, especially when it would have been good for him to see me in that state, but I couldn’t even get to the car without passing out.

Wednesday: nothing on but my neck and base of my skull started giving major trouble. Thursday: again nothing on but the pain was significantly worse, this time with serious inter-cranial pressure bringing me close to syncope every time I sat or tried to stand up.

Friday: Woke to moaning, my own moaning! I couldn’t move my neck at all. The migraine and pain was so bad I was not able to so much as open my eyes without wanting to scream. Every breath in, swallow, slight movement made my neck, base of my skull and what felt like my entire brain from searing! Extreme dizziness, fatigue, nausea and mostly pain. The thing was, If I could stay upright, I probably would have lived through the pain to go anywhere but if I tried to go more than a 45º angle off the bed I was starting to black out.

I had a pain specialist appointment that day in The University Hospital Limerick and I was in too much pain to go!

How does that even make sense? 😦

It was an important appointment too in that I would have been getting some neck X-ray results back from a couple of weeks ago to see if it needs to be escalated to an MRI, if not an upright MRI, and booked in for more steroid injections into my SI joint and the Occipital nerves of the base of the skull. Also, just like Tuesdays appointment with Dr. Akbar in CUH, it would have been great for him to see me in that state to understand the extent of what happens.

It’s not the pain, or nausea or anything, I can live with all of those,  (well sometimes I can’t but there is a constant baseline of sick that I live with daily that is manageable) but it’s the constant NCS/Vasovagal Syncope (They are the same thing) especially when it happens and my breathing stops, that’s what stops me in my tracks.

Then here we are today, Sat the 30th and I had to cancel that thing I was meant to be doing starting Monday (What I spoke about at the start of this rant!)

*Sigh…

I’ll just have to continue rescheduling life until I am physically able for these things. I feel guilty about this, feeling like I have let people down yet I know I can’t help it either! :/

Do you folks (Mainly with chronic illness’ but I would love for anyone to reply!) have to constantly reschedule? Do you feel bad for doing so while also knowing that IT IS IN NO WAY YOUR FAULT! or… am I just a strange thing?!

Share your thoughts and thank you so much for reading. 🙂

I had a HIDA Scan a couple of weeks ago too, I will do a blog post for that alone, it was an interesting if not somewhat boring test, but ill fill you in on that next time 😉

 

Admitted To Hospital, Possible New Diagnosis

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This was me getting ready to go home so I look a lot happier than when I was admitted first!

Oh dear! it happened again!

On Monday the 30th March, I was taken to hospital by ambulance after being bed bound and in severe pain with my gallbladder all over the weekend. I held out as long as I could at home because I knew nothing would be done over the weekend if I went into A&E.
On the Monday, things just got a little too much for me and we had to call for me to be taken in.

I am very disappointed with my GP in all of this. I had gone to him a couple of weeks before this happened, with a renewal script for some very strong pain killers that were prescribed to me when I was last admitted to hospital for the same thing in December. My surgeon had prescribed these opiate based drugs for the pain that helped and were needed. When I went to my GP to renew, he said only Cancer patients get these drugs and that he wouldn’t renew my script even though a higher authority than him prescribed me what I needed!

Then, when my Gallbladder pain started up again last week, we called him about getting referred into the Acute Surgical Unit (ASU) in the University Hospital Limerick, as this was said to me the last time I was in, that if I had more pain, not to go through A&E but to be directly referred in. He didn’t come through on this either. When we rang he gave some excuse about not having my files with him in the surgery he was at (His 3 surgeries computer systems are linked, he should have had all my information in front of him!) and when he called the ASU he couldn’t organise a bed for me so when everything got too much, we just called an Ambulance anyway and I had to go through the A&E system like everyone else. Which is fine but it was unfortunate the GP couldn’t come through. He has been very angry lately when we visit him. He is constantly giving out and very bitter about the HSE (Health Service Executive) and he complains to his already sick patients, This is not just coming from me but from other patients of his that I have spoken to. To be honest I am getting sick of his attitude and shortly I will be transferring to a lovely lady doctor who has come highly recommended!

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My hand reacted strangely to the morphine, the IV line was hardly hanging in my vein too so it didn’t last long!

So I was in the A&E about 10 hours, They did a chest XRAY first, then I was being pumped full of morphine through an IV line that was barely hanging on to one of my tiny veins. The doctor in A&E had tried about 5 times to find a vein and by the time I got to the ward the Line had already failed and they had to call another doctor up to fit a new one. He had some trouble and tried about 8 times before he got one and again it was just about in the vein and he said it may only last a few hours. My veins are useless and over the next week, I had three more doctors try about 18 more times to get veins and each line would fail or they just couldn’t get access, eventually during the week they give up on me and give me oral antibiotics when I am able to take them.

Just as I was in my ward Bed and getting ready to sleep, it was about 2am and they called me for an abdominal XRAY. It was over before I knew it, I was back to bed, Injected with something that helped the pain, popped on a drip and I tried to get comfortable enough to sleep.

Not a single wink was had!

It was quiet and all on the ward but I was sore, the surroundings were different, there were beeps and talking in the background and just everything that home wasn’t!

I was uncomfortable and twisted and turned through the night and into the next morning.

The following morning the surgical team came to see me and discuss my case, The same doctor and team that had me in December. He mentioned that he was happy to see me again but not under these circumstances and he felt by looking at me that I had lost weight. They ordered an ultrasound of the gallbladder so that they could compare it to the one from December when I was in then.

At that time my gallbladder was distended and had fluid around it showing infection. It didn’t respond to the fat test and showed it had dysmotility as well as gut dysmotility.

This time the ultrasound came back normal, no sign of infection in it or in my bloods. They mentioned about the possibility of taking out the gallbladder but as it looked healthy with the worry that my EDS may slow or aggravate healing, they were reluctant, as was I!

The head doctor said to give him some time as he wanted to speak with a colleague, the Dean of the Medical School at University Hospital Limerick, who knew surgeons in the UK who deal with rare cases like me. So now the waiting game begins!

I have to say he and his team are excellent. They have a real interest and go to great lengths to diagnose and be careful about removing anything they shouldn’t unless they absolutely have to! They also have an interest in learning more about EDS which is great to see. Unlike some of my other doctors who just don’t seem to care at all.

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Gadgety Bed!

Most of the time I was trying to sleep on the very comfy gadgety bed that I could move into all sorts of comfy positions or stoned out of it so all I could do was lie there in a sweaty trance trying to ignore pain and wishing sleep would come to me!
My BP was very low as I hadn’t been eating for many days due to horrible nausea and vomiting so I had missed my regular meds for those days. Over the week, once the nausea was controlled I was taken off the fast and put on a light diet, I could hardly eat anyway but getting a tiny bit of nutrition really helped. I was also able to take my regular meds which helped normalise my BP and I began to feel a little human again.

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Mostly pain meds, an antibiotic and meds to raise my BP

On Friday, as it was coming up to the long weekend I was eager to get home, though still in pain and I had no clue as to what they wanted to do with me, I asked what was the possibility of me going home for the weekend? and they said no problem as long as I was prescribed everything I needed! YEAY!!! I was delighted then everything came together! I was visited by some doctors and got some information, finally!

I was seen by a pain specialist, she was going through my pain meds and what I needed to be comfortable at home until they call me into them next week where they can review everything and make a pain management plan going forward.

Later on, I was visited by a UK Surgeon, The Dean of the Medical school. He told me he trained and studied under Prof. Rodney Grahame (The Prof. in London who officially diagnosed my EDS) and highly respected his opinion. I was delighted to speak with him. He was a gentleman and explained to me what he thought was going on.

They as a surgical team discussed my case and came to the conclusion that the gallbladder may have been masking the true pain that could be coming from a thing called the ‘Sphincter of Oddi

liverpancreas_text

I know right, WHAT? Never heard of that before, but long story short, there is a little valve thingy under your gallbladder that allows bile though it to add to the pancreatic juices that feed into the digestive system to help you break down and digest your food. This sphincter opens and closes but if you have this dysfunction, it remains clamped shut and cramped and causes a back up of bile and severe abdominal pain. It is most common in people who have already had their Gallbladder taken out, I still have mine so it is a strange one!

There is a test to check for it called ERCP, endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography, a procedure that uses an endoscope and looks directly deep inside the duct system while taking pictures and measuring pressure. You have to be sedated as it is way deeper into your system they have to look than a regular esophageal, stomach endoscope or similar.

While they do this, they inject some Botox into the tiny sphincter itself which relaxes it and allows it to open again. If after about 2 weeks your pain is gone, this is a sign you have the dysfunction.

The cure for it? a series of ops where again I will be put to sleep and they have to cut the sphincter to weaken it to the point where it can’t clamp up any more. This should take a few turns because if they do it all at once and cut straight through it, there is serious risk of heavy bleeding with this so they do it in small stages over time to make it safer.

This procedure however, has never been done in the University Hospital Limerick and it is not licensed here. But they are seeing what they can do for me, if it can be done, I will be the first person they will have done this op on! If they cant license it here, I may have to go to The Matter Hospital in Dublin or even as far as the UK if needs be, however because I am being treated publicly, these procedures if done in the UK will be fully covered by the HSE. This is a huge relief!

So in the mean time, He and the surgical team looking after me are going to sit down with some other doctors in a Multi Disciplinary Meeting where they will discuss my case and how to proceed with it and once they have a plan in place they will call me in for the initial test. I feel kinda special! but I can see why this meeting needs to be done. If I do have this thing, those procedures need to be licensed and I am sure that includes some amount of paperwork!

So for now, I am happy to be home with the furry pup and himself, I am comfortable (enough) on the pain medication and I await my appointment for next week to be called back in to the Pain clinic and then the appointment to be followed up by the surgical team.

For now, I will try to relax and recover, it is hard on this medication as it has some nasty side effects, but if it helps the pain I cant complain! HA! could put that on a T-Shirt!

Anyway, that is all for now, I will update again soon 🙂

Lette (Fainting Goat)