About Fainting Goat

This blog is to raise awareness of POTS, EDS and all forms of Dysautonomia in Ireland. To form a safe and welcoming place for all patients, friends, medical professionals and anyone interested to share experiences and information with others.

Low Histamine Diet For MCAS and Gastro Related Issues

Food

 

I am so so sorry, It has been months and months since I wrote in this blog but I thought what better way to start back into it than writing about something that has helped me almost miraculously in the last year.

The Low Histamine Diet. 

Last March (2017) I went to London to go to an appointment with the renowned Prof Qasim Aziz for serious gut related problems and weight loss stemming from my EDS. You can read all about that trip Here and you can read Prof. Aziz’s medical report and related advice from my visit Here.

My symptoms included serious weightloss (3.5stone) in a short period of time and strong constant bedridding nausea and vomiting that I was getting multiple times a day as well as excruciating gut pain which my doctors thought was stemming from the gallbladder and were considering operating on it before I traveled over and started Aziz’s amazing advice!

His recommendations then were as follows:

  1. Slowly reduce Opioids as they are slowing gut function. Stop, Reduce and increase some medications as explained during the appointment.
  2. For small intestinal bacterial overgrowth I have suggested a prescribed antibiotic twice a day for 2 weeks following which she should take a probiotic.

  3. I would suggest that she sees a senior pain management specialist locally to consider splanchnic nerve blocks but it may also be helpful for her to have a spinal MRI of the thoraco-lumbar spine to make sure that there is no nerve root pressure.

  4. I have given her detailed dietary advice and have generally suggested a diet low in sugar and grains but high in white meat, vegetables and healthy fat such as olive oil. Overall I have also suggested that she should reduce the histamine content of the foods that she eats and have suggested some resources that she can look at. I have also suggested Calorific drinks, vitamins and minerals such as vitamin C, B complex, omega 3 and chelated magnesium.

As soon as I got home I started the diet and calorie drinks straight away, I sorted the antibiotic and supplements a few weeks later but within 3 days of starting the diet I noticed huge improvements already so I was very hopeful!

It has now been just over a year on this diet and though I was only supposed to try it for 6 months I found that every time I reintroduced foods back into my diet that symptoms would start back up again so I have just stayed on it! It suits me and I don’t find it very hard.

So… Has it helped?

The answer is a resounding YES!

All my worst symptoms have actually gone, no exaggeration, My nausea and vomiting is now completely controlled, the severe pain I was getting in my gut that my doctors thought was all the gallbladders fault, is GONE! Actually gone, no more gut pain that had landed me in hospital multiple times, gone! It is just bliss!
My weight has maintained over the last 5 months at 52kg with is fantastic, no more constant weight loss!

As for my other symptoms? Yes they have improved no end too, though I still get dizzy I am nowhere near as bad as I was at my worst! I am so so happy it has worked for me, I can not recommend this diet enough. Though I will always advise that if you are starting any new diet or supplements etc. be sure to run it by your doctor first to be sure it will suit you!

So… How does the diet work?

It works by reducing inflammatory allergens that can make your digestive system swell and get raw as well as not function properly.

Find the diet plan that I follow Here.
How you follow it is as follows:
Anything that is a 0, you can eat as much of as you like!
Limit anything that is a 1,
and outright avoid anything that is a 2 or 3!

That is it! That is as complicated as it gets!!

The diet is restrictive enough that there are few grains, no sugar, no alcohol, no chocolate (Except some white), no tomatoes, no raspberries, no strawberries, no red meat except beef, nothing that will ferment in your gut to name but a tiny few.

However how successful it has been for me means that this restrictiveness is so worth all of it! I don’t find the diet hard at all and I find I am still getting plenty of calories daily.

It really has been life changing for me. It was designed specifically for people with MCAD so those of you who have MCAD or who think you may have it like me (Aziz thinks I may have it) or if you have Dysautonomia or EDS then this diet is for you!

As always get advice from your doctor before you start anything new, everyone is different and what may suit me may not work for you but if you have any questions about this diet, I will be delighted to answer them based on my own experiences from the last year on it.

That is all for now, chat again soon folks 🙂

Advertisements

New Robot Ears!

22339298_10209356984352788_6434377015053200801_o

So on Monday this week I finally got fitted for my new hearing aids, they are a pair of Phonak Nathos S+ aids with moulds to fit my ears and programmed for my hearing loss which the lady said was in the region of 100db of a loss in both ears which is huge I thought and a dis-improvement on my last tests which were far too long ago!

I have only worn them for a couple of days now and I find them excellent! The sound is powerful and natural enough sounding. They are not heavy in my ears though they feel slightly heavier than my last aids but not by much.

The moulds are silicone and softer than my last ones but a slightly tighter fit so take a little getting used to as after wearing them all day yesterday I found they hurt the ears just a tiny bit, more like got tired from wearing them all day. Once taking them out though my ears felt like normal again so its just a matter of getting used to them I think.

The hearing aids have little musical earcons when they turn on, which is pleasant to hear and when you use the volume switch they make more earcons to tell you when you have gotten to the highest or lowest level it will give you a slightly different earcon but it is all very intuitive.

The best thing about them is they are programmed to work together, so if I change the volume in one of the aids, they sync and the other aid will adjust the level to the same as the aid you have adjusted so it saves you having to change the volume on both ears.

Thats about the brunt of them I think, I was called to the consultants appointment in the University Hospital Limerick on the 6th of June where I was given an in depth hearing test and referred to the hearing aid clinic. Then within a month I got another appointment for The Hearing Aid Clinic for the 30th August for another hearing test and fitted for the moulds, then I was called back there within the month again for the 9th of October to actually pick them up, get them fitted and programmed so that was nice and quick really.

 

img_0429-1

I had my last pair of hearing aids for over a decade! They were a pair of Oticon GB50’s analog aids and they were my daily ears for years! They were in dire need of an upgrade at this stage! The moulds and tubing had yellowed and hardened and the sound wasnt powerful enough for my hearing loss as it has gotten so much worse over the last few years so the upgrade was badly needed.

I wrote before about my hearing loss, underdeveloped Eustachian tubes and middle ear disease, which has lead to 12 operations on my ears, you can read all about that here.

I have often wondered if all this hearing loss is EDS related as I have had hearing problems all my life since I was born, much like the EDS so I have to ask if they are connected, I am only curious on this as there is no proof to say that they are linked at all. However from reading many forums and pages online it seems some hearing loss can be attributed to EDS but it is not definite only anecdotally.

Still an interesting question though.
Have YOU EDS?
Do YOU have any sort of hearing loss or ear problems?

Please let me know in the comments below, I would love to hear about this from more people, just out of curiosity!

Thank you for reading folks, back soon with more news!

Lette (The Fainting Goat!)

 

Woo! Shortlisted for The V By Very Blog Awards Ireland 2017

V for Very Blog Awards 2017_Judging Round Button_Shortlist

I am delighted to announce that I just got an email from V by Very Blog Awards Ireland 2017 and Irish Dysautonomia Awareness, this humble bloggie, has made the Shortlist for 2017.

We are now onto the next round ‘The Finalists’ where the blog will be judged on:

  • How engaging, entertaining and informative is your writing?

  • How consistent is your blog? Is every nook and cranny taken care of?

  • How do you compare to other blogs? What makes you unique and stand out?

     

I just want to take this opportunity to firstly thank everyone who put the blog forward in the first place and also thank you to the judges who deemed the blog good enough to make it this far this year, I am delighted.

Thank you all once again and here’s to the next round!

 

Lette (The Fainting Goat)

 

 

 

Longlisted in The ‘V by Very’ Blog Awards Ireland 2017

V for Very Blog Awards 2017_Judging Round Button_Longlist

YEAYYYY!!! This humble little bloggie has been Longlisted in the ‘V by Very’ Blog Awards Ireland this year under the Health and Wellness category, THANK YOU ALL SO MUCH for voting and putting this blog through for this round, I hugely appreciate it, thank you!!

Next comes Round 2 the Shortlistings where the blog shall be judged on:

Overall Blog Design
The Reading Experience
The Knowledge of the Writer
How Responsive it is on PC, Mobile and Tablet

hopefully we shall make it, here’s hoping!! Fingers and toes crossed!!

Thank you all once again ❤

Lette (Fainting Goat)

 

Blog Awards Ireland 2017

Hi all,
Hope you are all as well as can be, sorry about the little hiatus, I was in hospital and im only just out but more on that in another post, right now I am back for a bit of begging!!

It’s that time of year again where nominations for the best blogs in Ireland go forward for the Blog Awards Ireland and I have just entered this humble little bloggie in for the running.

If you have just a moment to nominate, and thats all it will take, please nominate the blog by scrolling down and popping in the blogs url at the following link

If the blog makes it to the Long List I will be back looking for further support from you so I just want to say a massive thank you to all who take the time to support this blog, THANK YOU!

Will be back soon with another medical update from while I was in hospital and more on my current new diet 🙂 Thanks all 🙂

Saturday Submissions – With MeggioMum

Todays Saturday Submissions is brought to you by MeggioMum A.K.A Heather, who lives with Pots and EDS, be sure to check out her wonderful blog about ‘Two cents from a Midwest Mom’, HERE.

_____________________________________

Potsy Mamas: What We’re Hiding

No, I’m not talking about marijuana, though that would definitely be an interesting article. I’m actually talking about coping with chronic illness while raising a family. Perhaps you’ve heard of Disautonomia, Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), or Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. Perhaps you haven’t. But these conditions are very real, and being a mom of four (soon to be five) while living with them is a surreal experience full of both suffering and beauty.

Imagine for a moment that, like every mother on the planet, you have more things to do in a day than are physically possible to accomplish. Now imagine trying to tackle that when your body feels heavy like you’re wading through thick mud, and coffee only makes the feeling worse. You’re exhausted like you’ve just run a marathon… ALL THE TIME. Walking up the stairs is like mountain climbing without oxygen. You have to constantly write yourself notes and set alarms on your phone because your memory is swiss cheese. Complex situations are overwhelming because your brain is in a fog, like when you first wake up in the morning, except it never goes away. The mere act of standing makes your heart jump in your throat, and the smallest movements can dislocate a rib or hyperextend a knee. And you are in significant pain every waking moment.

What happens when you live like this every day is both heartbreaking and inspiring. A series of things start to unfold. The first thing to go is your house. Dishes and laundry pile up, as does random clutter everywhere. You forget to clean the cat box and don’t have the energy to mow the lawn. Your house starts to look like an episode of Hoarders and you’re too ashamed to invite people over or even let your kid’s friends inside to play.

Then goes your self esteem. You blame yourself for all the things you know you should be doing. You feel lazy and worthless. Thoughts creep into your mind like “I’m not trying hard enough”  “I’m such a burden” and “My family must be so disappointed in me.” You curse your body for not working right, and feel resentment towards both yourself and towards healthy people who live more mainstream lives. Your marriage suffers, both physically and emotionally, and you start to tell yourself that your spouse would be happier without you.

The guilt and self-blame are the worst when it comes to your children. You want to give them the world, and instead they don’t even bother to ask if you’ll take them to the park because they know that pained look in your eye all too well. You teach your children to be self-sufficient and independent; more out of necessity than anything else. You are proud that your teens can cook dinner, wash their own clothes, and fix their own bikes. You love how your younger kids can quietly entertain themselves outside in the fresh air without you hovering over them. But you also know that their childhood is flying by at lightning speed while you’re laying in bed trying not to throw up.

Then comes the judgement squad. Doctors not familiar with your condition, random people on the street, your kid’s teachers, coworkers, sometimes even your own family members. Everyone has an opinion on how severe your illness is and how you should be handling it. A lot of people don’t even believe your condition is real because you look “normal” on the outside. Your slurred speech and shaky movements means you sometimes get mistaken for an alcoholic or drug addict, and then treated with open disdain and discrimination.

Some people will be sympathetic, but insist you’ll be cured if you would just take more ginseng, or stop eating gluten, or do more yoga. My personal favorite is when they tell you to think positive and visualize yourself healthy.

I am a strong believer in homeopathy, clean eating, healthy exercise, and so on. But none of these things are magic cures that will stabilize the blood flow to my brain and keep my joints from dislocating. None of these things will keep my autonomic nervous system from misfiring like an electrical short. This is what leads to the final stage: the mask.

You start hiding your condition as best you can from the world. You grit your teeth and smile through the dislocations and spasms. When someone asks what’s wrong, you tell them you’re “just a little tired” instead of telling the truth. People get tired of hearing about your symptoms and start to tune you out. You avoid social interaction as much as possible, and start lying to cover up for it. (“Oh I’m sorry I missed the meeting, I had a flat tire”). You completely shut down in stressful situations because everyday life is already stressful enough, and you just can’t bear any more. You decide it is so much easier to put on the normal facade than wasting energy trying to make everyone understand. (Because 80% of them never will.)

I am trapped inside this body like a butterfly in a cocoon, except I don’t get to break free and fly.

There is an odd beauty to it though. This purgatory of inbetween health- not sick enough to be disabled, but not healthy enough to be normal- is like slowing down and living your life in stop motion. You learn to appreciate tiny moments like the sun warming your skin, the crinkle of smile in your daughter’s eyes, the earthy flavor of a hot cup of tea. You appreciate the people who stick by your side, and love them fiercely for it. You learn to let go of the things that don’t matter; like messy hair,  dirty kids, and judgemental people. You learn to slow down and just breathe.

We are moms (and dads) worth knowing.

__________________________________________________

Thanks so much to Heather for submitting this post today, does this relate to you? How do you find juggling parenting and family life with chronic illness? If you relate, please leave a comment or consider following the directions below and submitting your own post to share!

——— Wanna Be Part of Saturday Submissions?———-

All you have to do is tell us a little about yourself and write a blog post (Any word count) in relation to your chronic illness, or how a relation/friend/patient with an illness affects or interacts with you, etc. all welcome!

You can include photos (preferably your own, if found online be sure to add links to where you found them)

Be sure to add links to your social media accounts so people can link back to you OR You can write it anonymously if you like just be sure to put your details in the email so I can respond to you personally 🙂

You can send your submissions to: irishpotsies@gmail.com

Looking for Guest Bloggers Please!

Hi all, I am sharing this once again as I am still on the lookout for guest bloggers to share their chronic illness stories here on the blog with us, if you are interested all details in the post below! 🙂 Please share to those who may be interested, thank you all ❤

Irish Dysautonomia Awareness

guest-blogging

Hi folks,

I am still on the lookout for guest posters for this little bloggie, I would appreciate hearing back from anyone with or in contact with a chronic illness. Patients, Partners, Family, Friends, Carers, Therapists, Doctors, anyone who would like to take part. If you know of anyone who might like to, please share this with them, thank you!

It can be completely anonymous or open, whichever you prefer, please just follow the steps below to take part and I really look forward to hearing from you 🙂

Also, a very BIG Thank You to those who have submitted something already, I hugely appreciate the efforts, thank you 🙂

——— Wanna Be Part of Guest Blog Submissions?———-

All you have to do is tell us a little about yourself and write a blog post (Any Wordcount) in relation to your chronic illness, or how a relation/friend/patient with an illness affects…

View original post 80 more words